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After the spring ephemerals in the woodlands fade, I like to turn my attention to the meadows for native seasonal blooms.  While the striking goldenrod and lush warm-season grasses won’t bolt and bloom until late summer, delicate flowers litter the cool-season grass sea.  The wet areas are especially colorful this time of year.  Time to put my botany degree to work!

The Pale-Spiked Lobelia (Lobelia spicata) forms spike-like racemes of petite, pale blue flowers.  The specific name, spicata, refers to the unbranched “spike” that rises from the ground.

 

Foxglove Beardtongue (Penstemon digitalis) bears white flowers tinged with hints of lavender near its base.  This flower displays a resemblance to the popular garden Foxglove flower, hence the specific name of this plant (digitalis) is the same as the generic name of garden Foxglove.  Both genera, Penstemon and Digitalis, are in the Plantain family (Plataginaceae).

 

 

Contrary to its common name, Meadow Evening Primrose (Oenothera pilosella) is a day-flowering species of evening primrose.  Its specific name, pilosella, refers to the downy hair that covers the stem and leaves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium spp.) is a cute perennial which is scattered throughout wet meadows and wetlands.  While not a true grass, it is in the iris family (Iridaceae).

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), as many people know, is a wonderful host plant for the monarch butterfly caterpillar, and also is a wonderful pollinator plant.

 

Fringed Loosestrife (Lysimachia ciliata) presents bowed flowers which bloom from the axils of the plant.  This lower growing plant only reaches about a foot or two, so keep your eyes peeled in the tall grass!

 

Winterthur boasts almost 900 acres of natural areas including several hundred acres of meadow.  If you feel up to a light hike, be sure to follow the yellow arrows through natural meadow, woodland, and wetland habitat!

 

Poison Ivy Leaves

Leaves of three! Poison ivy is growing very rapidly with all this rain.

This is the time of year when I see evidence of gardening injuries among my friends and colleagues. One gardener I know broke her wrist and asked the doctor for a Gore-Tex cast so that she could wash the soil off after gardening. I once asked a visiting garden club from Virginia how many of them had ever been treated for Lyme disease and to my surprise every one of the 38 women raised their hands. Last summer I watched my neighbor hobble around his garden with his leg in a boot. He broke it after a fall – he was pruning from a ladder at the time. One gardener I knew in Virginia insisted on gardening with a patch over his eye – I really enjoyed giving him the nickname the “pirate gardener” (I think he enjoyed it too). These are hard-core gardeners, they are the kind of gardeners who are happy to go to plants sales in a downpour or to wake up at dawn on a Saturday to get outside. You know who you are!

I support this enthusiasm, but would like to temper it with a reminder to protect yourself. The basics of ‘PPE’ are pretty simple – PPE is short in our industry for ‘Personal Protective Equipment’ and includes recommendations for proper equipment you’d use for spraying pesticides and for using power equipment. When I say ‘simple’ just think of it this way, you ought to wear hearing protection, gloves, and eye protection whenever there is a risk of injury. You should also follow the label of any chemical you are applying and its recommendations for protective clothing. Put another way, if you have to raise your voice to be heard you should be wearing hearing protection; if something can get in your eye or strike your eyeball, you should be wearing eye protection; and use situation-specific gloves whenever there is risk of blisters or abrasion. It is all pretty common sense and you probably already do this to some extent. Here are some additional things I have learned over time.

Ticks

I spray my boots and gardening pants with Permethrin. Once the spray has dried it will last for a couple of washes and it is an effective deterrent to ticks. I use Picaridin on my skin to repel mosquitoes and ticks – I don’t use DEET any longer – that’s my personal preference. If you wear light colored clothing it is easier to see the ticks crawling on you.

Hands & Gloves

For cuts and blisters I use lanolin and band aids. If you buy the pharmaceutical grade lanolin that is sold in the maternity/baby section of the drugstore you can use it over bad blisters or cuts and it makes an almost waterproof barrier. Add a band aid and you are all set to get back to gardening. I have a bucket of different kinds of gloves such as rubber coated cloth gloves and leather gloves that I am constantly rummaging through to find the right glove for the job. For cleaning up after gardening I use surgical scrub brushes and old-fashioned bar soap. You can scratch the soap with your fingernails and then scrub with a surgical brush to get rid of your green fingernails.

Ears

I mentioned hearing protection above but it is worth re-emphasizing. You will almost always see our garden staff at Winterthur wearing hearing protection, even when they are just driving their utility vehicles, because there is a growing awareness of the cumulative damage that noise can cause to your hearing. The earplug-type protection is easy to carry, and so they have the convenience factor going for them, but I find that people often don’t use them correctly. Personally, I like the earmuff type of protection because it is much easier to get it right and be properly protected. I have the kind I can plug my iPod into and can listen to music while I am mowing, string trimming, or using a leaf blower.

Poison Ivy

I am not allergic to poison ivy but I really don’t want to develop the allergy, so I am careful about handling the plants. Yes, I do hand-pull poison ivy seedlings in my garden. Here is my process in a nutshell. I wear disposable gloves, I put several plastic bags out before I start, I have soap (like Dawn liquid) and cold water setup so I can wash, and I also set up my shower so that I can rinse off without touching too many surfaces when I am done. The active ingredient in poison ivy is an oil called urushiol. Chemically, urushiol is a hapten, a molecule that only causes an allergic reaction after it is bound to the proteins in our skin. This means that if you wash the oil away, you eliminate the potential allergic reaction. Cold water and soap are effective at washing away urushiol, but you can also use more powerful commercial products like Tecnu. I double bag the pulled up poison ivy after I have pulled it and I am cleaning up. Then I carefully remove the gloves I’ve used and throw those away too. I kick off my shoes and wash them with car wash detergent and cold water. I wash my clothes in cold water with detergent and I double rinse them to try ensure I leave no traces of urushiol in the washer. With the right planning, and if you are careful about secondary exposure to poison ivy, you can minimize your chances of an exposure that will result in a rash.

These are just a few of the steps I take to minimize my gardening down time. I am sure you have your own tricks and insights. If you do, please include them in a comment and I would be happy to share them. Happy gardening!

Come take a walk in the Winterthur Garden! This ramble takes in late May highlights beginning with the Peony Garden, continuing through the Pinetum, and ending in the Quarry Garden — with a couple detours along the way. Colors, forms, and fragrances abound as the pace of spring quickens towards summer. ~Photos by E. Anderson.

It’s that time! Come take a walk through the Peony Garden and enjoy the large collection of A.P. Saunders hybrids, which flaunt colors as diverse as yellow, red, white, lavender, and fabulous pink.

This Wednesday, May 16, Garden Horticulturist Michelle Stapleford takes you inside the garden with her Garden Insider walk, “A Passion for Peonies.” See the spectacle and learn more about the care and maintenance of herbaceous and tree peonies. 11:00 am. Walk leaves from the Brown Horticulture Learning Center. About 1 hour. Members free. Included with admission.

Hot pink herbaceous peony by E. Anderson

Golden yellow tree peony by E. Anderson

Come out and see the spectacular display of azaleas bursting into full bloom in Azalea Woods!

This Saturday, May 12, make a day of it and join us for “Azaleas, Bluebells & Follies,” a special event featuring guided tours and a sale of Winterthur azaleas. For more details, go to: http://www.winterthur.org/education/garden/garden-events/.

Azalea Woods in Full Bloom by Erica Anderson

This Sunday, April 1, Winterthur will open Follies: Architectural Whimsy in the Garden – our first exhibition in the garden. Follies highlights 6 original structures, many with interesting histories, and 7 new imaginative structures. The exhibit can be seen from the garden tram tour and can also be enjoyed on foot (the walk is approximately 1.1 miles through the garden). Maps are available in the Visitor Center and there are signs throughout the garden that will help guide you and tell you about the follies.

If you like technology, you can access our ‘Follies App’ on your smartphone or iPad. The web address is winterthur.oncell.com and it will soon be available on the App Store and Google Play.

For events and activities related to Follies, check our ‘Garden Events’ page at the tab above or follow this link.

These photos were taken Thursday afternoon – we hope they pique your interest!

 

I can’t believe that I have reached the final new folly description in the garden blog. I have never run a marathon but I can imagine as one approaches the finish line, a mix of exhaustion, euphoria and anticipation surges through one’s veins. This about sums up my emotional state as April 1st approaches.

Being a gardener connects one to “real time”. We can plan all we want but Mother Nature has the final word. One thing that I really love about the garden department at Winterthur is that we know how to roll with the punches. As I type this, snow and sleet tap at my window screen. Winter’s last hurrah (hopefully) but not what I had planned. As the forecast waffled back and forth then solidified to a pretty big storm, I strangely found a sense of relief. I am not sure why, as I would have thought just the opposite. I think that I just let it go.

Our inhospitable weather is actually a very fitting metaphor for our last featured folly, The Needle’s Eye. We have had quite a journey with this one and it has caused many of us to “rise to the occasion”. So, the story begins…

The idea for the Needle’s Eye came from the folly of the same name in Wentworth, South Yorkshire England. At 46′ tall, this sandstone pyramid, topped with a funerary urn marks the end of a allee. John Carr was commissioned to build this structure in response to a bet; the 2nd Marquis of Rockingham wagered that he could drive his horse drawn carriage through the ogee door.

The Needle’s Eye

Originally, the Winterthur version of this folly was to be placed near the front pond as you enter the estate, announcing the folly exhibition to guests. Further discussion lead to the concept of a boardwalk leading to it out in the water, then the final progression was “what happens if we float it out in the water?” Now at this point I should say that my degree is in horticulture–as are many of the folks in my department. Had it been in engineering, I might not have been so excited about this floating folly. Ignorance is bliss.

A Photoshop of The Needle’s Eye on the pond.

Initial discussion of the framework of this folly was simple. Stick built frame, plywood siding and of course all materials and finishes being weather and water resistant. A faux finish would mimic the look of the sandstone. We tried to gauge the appropriate height for our folly and used what was on hand; varying lengths of pole saws and extensions. The term I love for problem solving by using what is available at your disposal is “applying appropriate technology”. Through the “high-tech” use of our pole saws, we determined that our folly will be about half the size of the original and at 23′, it will still make a statement.

Golf cart with pole saws. Let the jousting begin!

The planning for the floatation aspect of this folly ensued and we looked to the use of a floating dock for inspiration. Floating docks are used in marinas and waterfronts so in theory, if we calculated the weight correctly and tethered the folly, we could float the Needle’s Eye on the water. Sounds plausible, right?

Planning continued on this folly but with no resulting action. An early January snowfall came along with the news that we were going to have to find a new builder for the folly. Pulling the quickest about-face that we could, we spoke with our carpenters at Winterthur about the project but also had to considered the realities of their time commitments with projects already slated. We had discussions with some outside contractors but the director of the garden, Chris Strand, through the powers of the internet, found Tony Caulfield of Caulfield Associates who works in creating floating docks and fortunately for us, his work schedule was light due to the off season. He could create the entire folly but we were unsure of his team’s faux finishing skills so we found a compromise; the structure would be built off site and then finished on site by our carpenters who we knew could pull off the finish. And so it began.

Our carpenters, Benny, Carl & Terry (along with masons John and Dan) figured out the logistics of the finish. Using the Dryvit siding system, they first place on fiberglass meshing then a brown coat, a finish layer, then a paint coat to mimic the original. They gave us choices for the finish and we chose the one closest to a limestone coloring.

The underlayment.

Finish options.

The top of the pyramid was the first to arrive and the gang got to it. Working weekends to fit it into the schedule, we were greeted to the brown coat on the Monday morning.

Delivery of the top of the Needle’s Eye.

First coat.

The pyramid top comes equipped with a chain to be able to place it on the base. The top will then be fitted with the finial. Easy-peasey!

The base was the next section to arrive. It came in 4 pieces and was assembled on site.

Delivery of the base parts.

When pieced together, the base had a rectangular opening. The carpenters had to then artfully cut an ogee opening on both sides.

Base placed together.

Ogee arch cut.

The foam “blocks” had to be cut and fitted and then the outline of the ogee enhanced.

First layer.

Detailing of Ogee and base.

Skim coat and some folly scale…

The base had to then be separated again yet held upright by straps, to allow for the finished coat to cure.

Second coat. Base separated for drying the seams.

The final delivery, which proceeded our second Nor’easter snowfall, was the floatation system. Through many design discussions, we came to the conclusion of making it two floating docks or pontoons that would then be tied together underwater for extra stability.

Delivery of docks complete with the previous night’s snow!

Brackets for underwater guying.

We tried to unload the pontoons with a fork lift but found that it was not adequate to do the heavy lifting. Enter Frank Quinnette, exhausted and sleep deprived from long hours of snow removal the night before, and ready to leave for the day when Carol’s voice beckoned on the radio for help…
Frank came to the rescue with the fork on our front loader and gently placed the docks onto the Visitor Parking Lot for staging. (Frank said that I better mention him on the blog…thank you, Frank!)

Docks awaiting their assembly.

Speaking of docks, there have been many conversations with in-house and outside engineers over how to keep this folly in place. Anchors? Ballast? Tethering? I have to admit here, that Chris has taken the reigns of this folly while I tended the other 6 “folly fires”. Chris sought the help of fellow garden department folks to help with the plan; enter Marlin, John and Kevin. Marlin cares for the natural lands at Winterthur including the ponds and Kevin and John are our arborists. You may question why arborists were brought in for a water project, but if you ever have watch skilled arborists work ropes to maneuver large limbs down to the ground, you’d know why! Chris held a meeting with the three of them to go over the logistics of the tethering. Not wanting to tempt fate with this statement, I trust in the abilities of these four people.

Our plan for tethering.

The ponds had to be lowered to enable the placement of the anchoring systems in the wall and on opposing shores.

Pond lowered to place in anchoring points on shore.

Row boat in place for securing the folly.

So now the day of reckoning arrives. On Monday, Rich from Bob’s Crane Services will be set to task for placing not only the Needle’s Eye together and in the pond but also place the Mirrored Folly at the Pinetum’s edge. In preparation for Monday’s “launch”, Ben, Carl, Terry, John and Dan (plus a few extras, I am sure) will set the Needle’s Eye folly parts in place. The crane will roll in early Monday morning—blocking the entrance into Winterthur, to set the base onto the pontoons and the pyramid top onto the base. From there, the carpenters will attach and secure all of the parts to one another and the crane will move to Garden Lane to place the Mirrored Folly. We will break for lunch and then set up once again at the pond to set the finial onto the top of the Needle’s Eye and then launch the folly out to, well, pond. An initial tethering will occur with further cinching down the following day (by above stated “tethering crew”).

The last detail–the finial.

Our version of the funerary urn.

More urn detail–since it will be 23′ up in the air!

This is a folly that has challenged us in ways different from the rest. It has tested us as far as our timeline is concerned and has taken us to a point of discomfort and ill-ease. It’s at those points where we may want to throw in the towel, because we are confronting the unknown and the unknown is scary. What I am more proud of than anything is (despite some sidebar grumbling I am sure) that when the chips were down we all drew strength from adversity to make this come together. It will be the flagship folly that greets visitors as they come and go from the property and a reminder of making the challenging elements in our lives possible.

Deep gratitude and thanks to all who made the Needle’s Eye and the entire Follies exhibition a reality!

The most likely source of reflection in a garden is water. Caught at the right angle, it can capture the movement of clouds in the sky, flocks of birds flying overhead and provide a dreamlike look at the world around us—especially when captured in a photograph.

Gazing globes have been a part of the garden since the 13th century. Originally created from hand blown glass in Venice, they not only served as reflective ornament but also believed to ward off evil. With time, they evolved to encompass many other reflective materials such as mirror and shiny metal. Now considered by some to be kitschy, they have had their popular moments in garden history.

Reflective exteriors are often on high rises and paired with a very modern, sleek style of architecture. Reflective materials can also distort an image—think convex mirrors or mirrors in a fun house for example. Whether realistic or distorted, our eyes are drawn to reflection—even if it is our own face looking back at ourselves.

Mirrored follies are not common in the landscape. In fact, I have only seen one and it is a mirrored fence at Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY.

Alyson Shotz’s Mirror Fence at Storm King Art Center

Mirrored follies offer a surreal way to view the landscape and have an aspect of trickery and camouflage about them.

Mirror House by Ekkehard Altenburger in Isle of Tyree, Scotland


“Restructure” by Harumi Yukutake


Treehotel near the Lule River in Sweden.


“Lucid Stead” by Phillip K. Smith III in Joshua Tree, CA.


Often clean lined, we tried to imagine what would be an appropriate form for a mirrored folly in the Winterthur landscape; something that had unique detail in itself but could be made even more fanciful with reflection. The answer lies within our own property.

The Train Station at Winterthur has a unique history. Created by Theophilus P. Chandler in 1889-1890, it has an architectural style unlike any other on the property, featuring Chandler’s trademark steeply pitched gables, ball topped finials and wooden fishscale shingles. A unique piece of architecture, the only detail it shares with other buildings on the estate is the Winterthur sage green paint color and yellow brick walkways. One of the most prominent features of the Train Station is the porte-cochère or covered porch attached to the house.
A vaulted ceiling, fluted bases, tongue and groove interior, fishscale shingle exterior and a set of unique roof finials—wouldn’t that look cool in mirrors?

Porte-cochère of the Winterthur train station

The porte-cochère is another carpentry feat to recreate so we approached Rob McKeown of Elk Creek Cabinetry (and Chinese Pavilion fame) once again to help us with this project. Clearly, he likes working with us or is a glutton for punishment…but really, I think Rob likes a new challenge. The reason that I come to that conclusion is because at our second meeting, Rob came prepared…with a miniature model.

Set to scale, base of Mirrored Folly.


Base with roof.


Underside of base showing support for the legs.


After retrieving our socks from having them blown away, Rob modestly said that creating this helped him to figure out how to construct the folly. When we started talking about the finial, Rob reached into his bag o’ tricks and pulled out a mock up of that as well. 2 points for Rob!

Finial mockup next to miniature.

Some of the mirrored follies shown above made us question the pattern of mirror on our folly. Would it be better to separate the mirrors, clad them in fishscale shingles or use straight siding? We had some left over mirrored acrylic from an earlier exhibition, so Rob cut out varying patterns and created a prototype of the base to help us decide. We placed the sample outside for staff to come out and see and give an opinion. I think it was unanimous; all mirrored fishscale siding.

Varied shingle patterns for consideration.


We also utilized the mirrored base to position the piece in the sun—or rather out of the sun. The evergreen backdrop of the Pinetum would provide shade for the majority of the day but early morning sunlight shines on this site. We positioned the piece due north and the problem was solved and future eyesight was saved! The flare of the base of the leg will reflect a sky view from ground level while at eye level; it will reflect the meadow behind.

Testing placement with the sun.

This fall saw the installation of the decking for this folly by Bluewing Construction. Like a stage setting for a performance, the platform stands alone, along with its Ottoman Tent “decking cousin” until the folly lands in place this spring.

Where there are footings, there’s Carol with an auger…


Decking for the Mirrored Folly.


View to the Neoclassical Folly from the Mirrored Folly site.

When Rob finished the Chinese Pavilion, (delivered in January) he started the Mirrored Folly. Out of the frying pan and into the fire. Noting my anxiety over the timeframe, Rob was sending me picture updates of the offsite progress. With the help of a son on winter break, he quickly created the frame for the structure—which is beautiful in its own right—and as weather allowed, utilized his driveway again to work on the roof.

Vaulted rafters. I think it would be pretty just as is.


Another view of the structure. Great lines!


Roof with lift hooks on top. These will be covered by the finials.


Rafters. Note Winterthur sage green color!

The interior tongue and groove was installed then painted. Color choices were tossed about but we decided to go a bit traditional and use the Winterthur sage green.

Painted interior.

Now for the pièce de ré·sis·tance, the acrylic mirrored shingles. Initially, Rob was going to cut them himself then quickly came to his senses and contracted that portion out. The installation of the shingles should go quickly. Well, after the plastic covering is removed from the 600+ singles…

“Selfie” with shingle…and plastic covering.


Mirrored shingles getting their start.

Simple, built in seating inspired by the white benches at the nearby Latimeria Gates will provide, as all of the follies will, a place to sit and admire a new perspective of the garden.

White benches at the Latimeria Gates in the Pinetum.

This folly, like its Chinese predecessor, will be delivered in two pieces and then craned onto location; an instant folly. It has been great fun to see the on site progress of many of the follies and it is also a treat to have one magically appear in a day. Perhaps this “pop up folly” is in keeping with the surreal nature of this mirrored spectacle.

Snowdrops brightening a patch of pachysandra

This Saturday, March 10, is “Bank to Bend,” a day that celebrates the year’s first flowers. At Winterthur, those coveted blossoms always appear along the walk leading from the March Bank to Magnolia Bend, where you can literally walk in the footsteps of founder and avid horticulturist Henry Francis du Pont. Be sure to join us at Winterthur for a lecture, garden tour, and sale of rare and unusual plants!

This year’s featured speaker will be Peter Zale, Curator and Plant Breeder at Longwood Gardens. In his talk, “Intrinsic Beauty: Snowdrops, Choice Bulbs, and How They Enrich Gardens,” learn how snowdrops and other early bulbs have been objects of passion and desire, leading plant explorers to remote regions of the world. With many of these bulbs being rare in the wild, be inspired as you hear how they have served as flagship species for conservation efforts. Finally, revel in the beauty of these exotic flowers that provide a sense of place in the garden at a time of the year that few other plants can rival.

The photos below were taken just prior to yesterday’s snowstorm! Enjoy this virtual ramble along the March Bank, which is now shrouded in snow. Saturday’s views will likely be different, but no matter what we will celebrate this special display and no doubt witness the tenacity of these small wonders of the late winter garden.  

Welcome back to the unfolding story of the follies. So far, we have covered the making of the Green Folly, the Chinese Pavilion, the Ottoman Tent, and the Neoclassical Folly with three more to highlight. This week, we are featuring the Gothic Tower. Towers are something that have appeared in our imaginations since childhood, featuring prominently in fairy tales, cartoons, movies and television shows. (Perhaps “Costumes of Game of Thrones” will be our next exhibition.) They are foreboding, alluring and magical all at once. They create a presence in the landscape and offer spectacular views from the top. Though not quite so common as other follies, a few of the gardens that we visited in England featured towers in the gardens. Lord Cobham’s Pillar at Stowe is a 115’ “tower-like” memorial whose circular stairs lead to the top and affords views of the entire garden (and beyond).

Lord Cobham’s Pillar, Stowe. Note few slit windows for light on steps.


King Alfred’s Tower at Stourhead is a 161’ triangular tower, hollowed in the center with a set of spiral steps (205 of them) leading to the top with views of surrounding counties.

King Alfred’s Tower, Stourhead.


Hollowed Center of the tower. Reminds me of the scene from Willy Wonka!


View from atop of the tower.


The 88’ Gothic Tower at Painshill—a mere 99 steps—was a folly that had a bit more functional use in its earlier days. Built in the 1750’s it was first used as a gallery to exhibit antiquities then later became a residence. Open for visitation on limited days (I only entered one of the three mentioned above), the views from the tops of the castles are spectacular but are impressive from the ground as well.

Gothic Tower at Painshill. Note limestone wash from original finish.

The placement of the Gothic Tower at Winterthur mimics the prominent locations of those in England, providing views both to and from them. The perfect spot at Winterthur: Oak Hill. The views atop Oak Hill are stunning on their own but raising them up by another 20+ feet and they get even better.

Using a high lift to see the view from tower height.


The location provides a good sight line from within the glass walls of the galleries as well, enticing visitors to come out and see this ominous black tower on the hill. Its size is proving to be visible from many angles which we did not consider but much like the house, only when the leaves are absent from the trees.

An unexpected pleasant view, making good use of stone retaining walls.

We approached Troy Marino of Michael Marino, Inc. to see if he would be interested in heading up this unusual construction project. Without batting an eye or giving us a queried look, he agreed. As one might imagine, a tall structure on top of a wind-swept hill would have to be well secured. The outline of the tower and wall were sited followed by twenty-two auger holes for footings.

The success of an auger full of soil.


Footings.


Cleaning up and tamping down each footing prior to inspection.


The tower walls were created as individual panels off site then secured together onsite, creating an instant tower.

The first wall placed. Looks like a monolith, blocking out the morning sun.


Instant tower…with one wall left to go.


The stairwell walls followed and then the structure really took shape.

Tower with battlements and walled staircase.


In the design process, we contemplated the surface of the tower floor and steps. What would be a strong flooring, would let water through and could provide a look that we liked? Samples of fiberglass flooring were on hand from another project and after discussing its merits, we agreed that we liked the look and strength that it would provide. There were several options of this flooring but form followed function; we choose the one that had a tighter weave and would not allow a cell phone or keys to fall through. We also created a working door in the design for the special something that unavoidably makes its way through the holes. From there, we contacted Brooks Bentz from Design Plastic Systems to help with the flooring.

Grating options, tested by cell phones.


The view from below as I retrieve that which has fallen!


Unlike the more historic towers, we chose to make ours from wood and have the steps leading to the top be incased in a wall-like structure (as opposed to spiral interior stairs), providing a bit more girth to the folly. Mixing media a bit here, our Gothic tower has an Asian touch to it, with the charred wood finish to the siding. This is known as Shou Sugi Ban.

Shou sugi ban charring process. Photo courtesy of reSAWN timber


We found a local distributor of this siding, reSAWN Timber Co. in Telford, PA. They met with us and showed the varying degrees of char on different types of wood, each providing its own unique pattern and color. We chose a heavy char to provide a very black look to the finish.

An in house attempt at charring wood!


Our charred finish.

Battlements give the tower that classic fortress look and the crenels, or gaps, will be filled with hand-forged metalwork by Seth Barchowsky (who created the “window” in the Green Folly and the railings on the Troll Bridge in Enchanted Woods)

Unpainted grates that will be placed in the crenels of the battlements.


This week marks the placement of the siding on the exterior of the tower, making the ominous appearance take shape.

Siding on the tower with dark skies behind. Creates a mood!

The placement of this folly not only takes advantage of the views but is also conveniently located near Enchanted Woods. I foresee this folly being a favored one among the children, and like Enchanted Woods, may bring out the child in all of us.