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October 8, 2014 – Winter winds will soon blow through our gardens. How might we use berries, bark, foliage, and flowers to enliven our landscapes? Consider stunning native plants, early-blooming bulbs, and ornamentals. Share your experiences and get new ideas while walking with Karen Steenhoek, assistant curator of garden interpretation, as she takes us through the garden and introduces us to her favorite winter plants.

10-8 Acer griseum 9_21_2010 LE 001

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesday at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

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Photo by Bob Leitch

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Photo by Bob Leitch

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Photo by Bob Leitch

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Photo by Bob Leitch

 

 

Round up the kids, neighbors, and grandkids and head over to Winterthur this Saturday, October 4. It’s Truck and Tractor Day!

You’ll find a new and improved tree climbing activity where you can pretend to be an arborist, the ever popular fire hose demonstration put on by Winterthur’s own fire company, and our two newest staff members, Franklin and Stanley. http://gardenblog.winterthur.org/2014/09/23/meet-franklin-and-stanley-two-new-winterthur-employees/

Loads of details here: http://www.winterthur.org/?p=1105

Join us for the 3rd annual Truck and Tractor Day at Winterthur. Members, get a head start on the fun when we open at 9:00 am just for you! Avoid the parking hassles and let the kids climb on the farm equipment without waiting in lines, and then you’ll be ready for arts and crafts in the Brown Center when they start at 10:00 am! Kids are sure to have a blast during this fun-filled day with lots of outdoor activities.

Proceeds support the Winterthur Fire Department. Members free. Included with general admission. Rain or shine event.

Dr. Walter Hipple, Winterthur volunteer extraordinaire (among other things) provides his observations on the Winterthur Garden. The accompanying photographs are by another wonderful volunteer, Bob Leitch.

At this date–September 25–most of the most striking area of the gardens is not visible from the tram, nor even from the paved walk. That area is the East end of Oak Hill: from the Quarry walk back up a bit along the walk towards the Enchanted Woods — then around the copse at the left (i.e., South).

First, at the West end, you will see Tea Viburnum (Viburnum setigerum) with its brilliant red berries, A few steps further around the copse are the splendid purple Beautyberries (Callicarpa dichotoma). Above them are multitudes of the yellow fruits of Trifoliate Orange (Poncirus trifoliata)–they are indeed citrus fruits, but you will regret biting into one, as they are unparalleled for sourness.

And just beyond are the panicles of yellow berries of Viburnum dilatatum xanthocarpum (i.e., Yellow-berried Linden Viburnum). If you stand at the right spot, you see a perfectly composed picture of the Beautyberries, the Trifoliate Oranges, and the Yellow-berried Viburnum.

But not everything worth seeing is above the ground. Look down and you will see the first blossoms of Sternbergia lutea–brilliant yellow.  (If it has an English name, I don’t know it.) Off to the south is a great patch of  lavender Colchicum, ‘Autumn Crocus’–which are really a kind of lily, not crocuses at all. (Lilies have six stamens in each flower; crocuses belong to the Iris family and have three.)

And then over at the slope going east is another species of Colchicum, larger, more vase-shaped, purple-and-white; there are hundreds of them scattered down the hill to the outlet rivulet from the Quarry.

Autumn has its beauties too!

 

September 24, 2014 – Ferns are a wonderful addition to the woodland garden, offering a variety of heights, textures, and colors. Join Linda Eirhart, director of horticulture and curator of plants, today on a stroll to discover a dozen of our best.

9-24 fern

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesdays at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

October 1, 2014 – Join Horticulturist Jessica Tsakiris on a walk through Oak Hill as she describes its history, plants, and restoration process.

10-1 oak hill

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesdays at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

Linda Bailey, Natural Lands Technician writes:

While driving past the main gate, you may have noticed the sheep of Negandank Barn have taken a hiatus from Winterthur and headed back to Greenbank Mill for the season.  This August, however, the barn has gained a couple new residents: Franklin and Stanley, a pair of Boer goats.  Winterthur acquired these friendly fellas from the New Castle County 4-H program.

Franklin and Stanley aren’t just some pretty faces lounging in the pasture all day!  The Natural Lands team has put them and their eating-machine reputations to work.  If you’ve had the chance to take a stroll through some of our outlying woodlands, you may have noticed that much of the understories are overrun by non-native invasive shrubs- Linden Viburnum, Burning Bush and Bush Honeysuckle, to name a few.  Since goats prefer munching on twigs and leaves to grazing grasses, they are perfect for mowing down a lot of the undesirable vegetation that is found in our woodlands.

So far, Franklin and Stanley have successfully and efficiently removed about 500 square feet of unwanted vegetation.  That’s a big amount of work for only about a week’s worth of dining!  The Natural Lands team followed up with small herbicide applications to ensure that those nasty invaders don’t come back.

If you plan on saying hello to these two, please remember – DO NOT FEED THEM!  Although they have a reputation of eating anything and everything and can make quite a compelling case that they are starving, there are actually a lot of plants that can make them sick.  They have lots of work to do, but won’t be able to do it if they have belly aches!  They will appreciate it in the long run!

Franklin

Franklin

Stanley

Stanley

September 17, 2014 – How would you like to know 97 percent of all trees you see? Join Chris Strand, director of Garden and Estate, today to learn how to identify 10 of the most common trees seen in our woodlands. He will cover basic identification and introduce resources for studying and learning trees.

9-17 beech

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesdays at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

Winterthur In Bloom – 9.8.2014

Hosta near Coach House and Peony Garden

Hosta near Coach House and Peony Garden

Meadow at Magnolia Bend

Meadow at Magnolia Bend

 

Thanks to two terrific volunteers, here’s the list of what’s in bloom in the Winterthur Garden this week:

http://www.winterthur.org/pdfs/Winterthur bloom list 9.8.2014.pdf

 

A crisp breeze blows through the Winterthur Garden, touching it with autumn hues of yellow, red and purple. To set off these warm colors, white ‘Royal Standard’ hosta and fluffy wood asters bloom along meandering garden paths. Bright goldenrod announces the coming of autumn – a prelude to excitement to come.

At Magnolia Bend, the purple plumbago beckons one to a stroll through the sun-kissed meadow. At the East Circle, glossy abelia and crape myrtle attract butterflies. As you walk in the Winterthur Garden, enjoy the surprise of lavender autumn crocus, the smooth fruit on the hardy orange trees and purple beautyberries that accent sweeping views across the Piedmont landscape.

Come, taste this season of beauty among the rolling hills of the Brandywine Valley.

 

Kevin Braun, estate arborist, writes:

We are getting ready for Truck and Tractor Day 2014! Here are some of our dedicated garden staff trying out our new kids climb equipment. Come on out October 4th and let your kids climb like a professional! The Winterthur Kids Climb will be open and running all day.

 

Up, up, and away!

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For details about Truck and Tractor Day:

http://www.winterthur.org/?p=1105

 

September 9, 2014 – Enjoy summer’s last blooms with Garden Horticulturist Suzanne French.  Join her on Wednesday, September 10, for a walk to the Quarry, where red, purple, white and yellow flowers mingle beautifully in the bog.

9-10 quarry

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August).  Wednesdays at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.