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Quarry Weirs Restoration

There has been a lot of activity below the Quarry Bridge over the past week; diversion of water, sediment removal, rock—or rather boulder placement and gentle grading.  Masonry preparation for repointing of the actual weirs has also taken place.

The reason behind all of the bustling is simple; the ponds had filled up with sediment, the sides needed better stabilization and the water was diverting every which way except for over the weirs.

The contractors who are working on the site have done similar projects on our many waterways here on the estate.  Pennoni Associates, Inc. is managing the project while Meadville Land Services, Inc work on “everything stream” and Rizzo Construction Company, Inc repairs the masonry.

In addition to countless pre-construction meetings, staff from the garden department has made several trips to a local quarry to hand select stone (about 35 tons worth), been on site to ensure placement of the stone matches the Winterthur aesthetic, problem-solved alongside contractors when the unexpected arose, and much documentation both through photos and GIS mapping.

Rain is giving the project a day of rest—and time for a blog post—but will continue on into at least next week.  The area is off limits to guests but safe viewing from the Quarry Bridge, Bristol Summerhouse on Sycamore Hill or on the bench on top of Colchicum Hill, will give a good snapshot of all aspects involved in this restoration.  Come and take a peek or at the very least enjoy the finished project for years to come.

Sediment Removal

Sediment Removal

 

Placement of Stone

Placement of Stone

Masonry Repairs

Masonry Repairs

Finished Stonework and Grading

Finished Stonework and Grading

More Stone Work

More Stone Work

Oak near Magnolia Bend on 10.30.14 about 6:00pm

Oak near Magnolia Bend on 10.30.14 at Sunset

 

Here’s the latest Winterthur Bloom list, dated 10.28.2014, thanks to two terrific and loyal Winterthur volunteers!

http://www.winterthur.org/pdfs/Winterthur bloom list 10.28.2014.no.35.pdf

 

 

October 29, 2014 – Use end-of-season plant material to add unique interest to your autumnal arrangements and displays by arranging with dried materials.

10-29 Yuletide 2012 LB Dried Flower Tree 0066

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesdays at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

Today, even with the rain, artists are busy capturing the beauty of the Winterthur Garden and Estate. They’re part of an event sponsored by the Children’s Beach House in Lewes, Delaware. The artists had two or three venues to capture each day this week, from Monday through Thursday. https://www.pleinairbrandywinevalley.org/

At Winterthur, the artists usually to gravitate to these spots:

  • The shimmering front ponds with fall-colored trees beyond
  • The back ponds and East Barn complex
  • Brown’s Meadow near Magnolia Bend with the wonderful fall colors of wildflowers
  • The Japanese Maple at Magnolia Bend

Friday night, 10/24/14, is the date of the big opening gala. You can still purchase tickets and be one of the first to see the artists’ work, or come to the Winterthur Visitor Center on Saturday or Sunday from 10-4 to see and purchase exquisite photographs and paintings. (No Winterthur admission tickets needed for the art sale.)

https://www.pleinairbrandywinevalley.org/store/catalog/category/view/id/6/

Here are a few shots of artists at work at the event in October 2013:

 

 

 

Enjoy these lovely garden photos by volunteer, Bob Leitch, taken on October 21, 2014.

Color displays are found in the fiery reds, blazing oranges and brilliant yellows of leaves contrasted against leaves that are still green. Look up and around throughout the gardens. Berries and fruits provide additional color in jewel-like tones.

Here’s the latest bloom list for the Winterthur Garden:

http://www.winterthur.org/pdfs/Winterthur bloom list 10.14.2014.pdf

 

 

 

October 22, 2014 – Join our garden guide, Mike Rausch, to learn the ins and outs of taking your tropical plants that have been sitting outside all summer and bringing them indoors for the winter.

10-22 October 7 2008 072

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesdays at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

October 15, 2014 – UD researchers will provide an update on the  research done on both Winterthur’s and nearby development Applecross’s ecosystems. Learn how different landscapes provide varied ecosystems and how we can improve landscape installation and management for beauty and the environment.

10-15 001

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesday at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

DSC_2521 hardy orange compressed

Photo by Bob Leitch

 

If you’re out walking in the Winterthur Garden, you might want to refer to the current bloom list, compiled by two amazing and dedicated volunteers:

http://www.winterthur.org/pdfs/Winterthur bloom list 10.08.2014 no.32.pdf

The most striking area is the East end of Oak Hill, across from the Quarry.

 

October 8, 2014 – Winter winds will soon blow through our gardens. How might we use berries, bark, foliage, and flowers to enliven our landscapes? Consider stunning native plants, early-blooming bulbs, and ornamentals. Share your experiences and get new ideas while walking with Karen Steenhoek, assistant curator of garden interpretation, today as she takes us through the garden and introduces us to her favorite winter plants.

10-8 Acer griseum 9_21_2010 LE 001

Walks last 45–60 minutes. Join us for demonstrations, talks, and guided walks covering a wide range of gardening topics. These events begin at 11:30 am on Wednesdays from April through October (except August). Wednesdays at Winterthur is free with all admission tickets. Members are free.

No reservations necessary. Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes. Walks are generally not handicap accessible due to rough ground and steep garden paths.

Welcome, October!

meadow 10.29.2013 kls

 

A crisp breeze blows through the Winterthur Garden, touching it with autumn hues of yellow, red and purple. To set off these warm colors, White snakeroot and fluffy wood asters bloom along meandering garden paths. Bright goldenrod announces the arrival of autumn – a prelude to exciting fall color to come.

At Magnolia Bend, the purple plumbago beckons one to a stroll through the sun-kissed meadow. At the east circle, glossy abelia continues to attract butterflies and bees. As you walk in the Winterthur Garden, enjoy the surprise of pink autumn crocus, the smooth fruit on the hardy orange trees, and purple beautyberries that accent sweeping views across the Piedmont landscape.

Come, taste this season of beauty among the rolling hills of the Brandywine Valley.

Here’s the latest bloom list for the Winterthur Garden, thanks to our terrific volunteers: http://www.winterthur.org/pdfs/Winterthur bloom List 9.30.2014 no.31.pdf