This weekend I put together a simple hike of about 3 miles that took me through Nursery Woods, where some of our most severe storm damage is on display, up through Chandler Woods. The hike is moderate with a little challenge at the Reservoir as you climb up the hill to the meadow. There should be elements of fall color along the walk and I spotted several deer. I have posted the trail to AllTrails for those who would like to try it (see below or follow this link https://www.alltrails.com/explore/recording/sat-29-aug-2020-23-03-4a3fd91?u=i).

Winterthur Reservoir


Winterthur Museum, Gardens & Library

WINTERTHUR BLOOM REPORT #24

 September 23, 2020

73F, sunny

 

+: Abundant

fbb: Flower-bud breaking

b: Some bloom

fb: Full Bloom

pf: Petals falling/drying

pb: Past bloom (few remain)

ber: Berries, fruits

.

Check these out:

  • The show is at its best: The autumn crocus (Colchicum byzantium – lavender-pink with white center and Colchicum ‘Giant’ – lavender-pink) is blooming on the east side of Oak Hill.  Look in the lawn between the hardy orange trees & the native azalea bushes, or get a great view from the bench adjacent to the Quarry Garden.
  • Fairy candles: Experience the magic of the fuzzy white spikes of fairy candles/fairy wands (Actaea acerina), also called bugbane, in Azalea Woods in the triangle along the east-west path nearest the 1850 House and along the serpent pathway in Enchanted Woods.
  • Gorgeous goldenrod: Walk the mowed pathways through the meadows to be immersed in goldenrod (Solidago species) flowers or stop on a hillside for a breathtaking view of gold.

 

ENTRANCE DRIVE AND PARKING AREA

pf         Abelia x grandiflora (Glossy abelia – soft pink)

fb         Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

ber       Asclepias syriaca (Common milkweed – green, prickly ‘teardrops’)

ber       Catalpa species (Catalpa – long, green, string-bean-like seed pods)

fb         Heptacodium miconoides (Seven-sons tree – white)

pb        Hydrangea paniculata ‘Grandiflora’ (Pee Gee hydrangea – pink to tan)

pf         Liriope muscari (Blue lily-turf – lavender)

ber       Paulownia tomentosa (Princess tree – clusters of round yellow-green seed pods)

ber       Physalis species (Ground cherry – green to tan ‘lantern’ seed pod – at far edge of parking lot near cherry trees)

fb         Solidago caesia (Blue-stemmed plume goldenrod – yellow)

fb         Solidago juncea (Early goldenrod – yellow)

b          Symphiotrichum ericoides (Aster ericoides/Heath aster – white)

 

LAGOONS

fb         Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

b          Chelone glabra (Turtlehead – white)

pb        Cicorium intybus (Chicory – blue)

pb        Cirsium muticum (Swamp thistle – reddish purple)

fb         Convolvulus species (Morning-glory vine – white, pink)

pb        Coronilla varia (Crown vetch – lavender-pink)

pb        Daucus carota (Queen Anne’s lace – white)

pf         Desmodium species (Tick trefoil – dark pink)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white – along Clenny Run)

pf         Galium mollugo (Wild madder – white ‘clouds’ of tiny flowers)

fb,+     Impatiens capensis (Jewel weed – orange)

fb         Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue)

ber       Maclura pomifera (Osage orange – ‘pebbly’ softball-sized green fruits – along Clenny Run)

pf         Oenothera biennis (Evening primrose – yellow)

b          Oxalis species (Wood sorrel – yellow)

ber       Phytolacca americana (Pokeweed – green berries turning purple on red stems)

fb         Polygonum hydropiperoides (Mild water-pepper – tiny white flowers)

fb,+     Solidago caesia (Blue-stemmed plume goldenrod – yellow)

pb        Solidago graminifolia (Lance-leaved goldenrod – yellow)

fb,+     Solidago juncea (Early goldenrod – yellow)

b          Symphiotrichum ericoides (Aster ericoides/Heath aster – white)

b          Symphiotrichum lateriflorum (Aster lateriflorus/Calico aster – white)

fb,+     Symphiotrichum novae-angliae (Aster novae-angliae/New England aster – purple)

b          Symphiotrichum species (Aster – pale lavender-blue)

pb        Trifolium pratense (Red clover – reddish-purple)

pb        Vicia cracca (Cow vetch – purple)

SUMMER SHRUB SLOPE

pf         Buddleia davidii (Butterfly bush – white)

fb         Hibiscus syriacus (Rose of Sharon – rosy purple)

pf         Hydrangea paniculata ‘Grandiflora’ (Pee Gee hydrangea – white/off-white turning pinkish-tan)

pf         Lagerstroemia ‘Biloxi’ (Crape myrtle variety – dark pink)

pb        Vitex agnus-castus (Chaste-tree – blue, pale pink, white)

PARKING AREA TO VISITOR CENTER

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pb        Lobelia siphilitica (Great blue lobelia – blue)

fb         Prenanthes species (Rattlesnake-root – greenish bell-like flowers)

b          Symphyotrichum cordifolium (Aster cordifolius/Blue wood aster – pale blue)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

WALK FROM VISITOR CENTER TO UNDERPASS

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pf         Hosta lancifolia (Narrow leaf hosta – lavender)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

b          Impatiens capensis (Jewel weed – orange)

WALK FROM UNDERPASS TO MUSHROOM

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

SLOPE DOWN TOWARDS MUSEUM

PEONY GARDEN

AZALEA WOODS

fb,+     Actaea acerina (Bugbane/fairy candles – white)

b          Colchicum species (Autumn crocus – lavender-pink – 1 flower, 1 bud)

fb         Collinsonia canadensis (Horse balm – small yellow flowers)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pf         Gentiana clausa (Closed gentian – dark blue)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

pf         Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue)

pb        Phlox paniculata (Garden phlox – pink)

ber       Smilacina racemosa (Maianthemum recemosum/False Solomon’s seal – bright red berries)

b          Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

LOWER AZALEA WOODS

fbb       Actaea acerina (Bugbane/fairy candles – white)

fb         Ceratostigma plumbaginoides (Plumbago – intense blue)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pb        Rhododndron mucronatum ‘Magnifica’ ( Magnifica azalea – white with strawberry speckles – 3 flowers)

b          Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

UPPER/EAST TERRACE AND STEPS

pf         Abelia x grandiflora (Glossy abelia – soft pink)

pf         Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

pf,+     Liriope muscari (Blue lily-turf – lavender)

ber       Magnolia grandiflora (Southern magnolia – pinkish to red fuzzy cones)

EAST FRONT OF MUSEUM & Around Corner

fb         Abelia x grandiflora (Glossy abelia – soft pink)

fb         Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white – behind Bath House)

ber       Callicarpa dichotoma (Purple beautyberry – purple berries)

ber       Callicarpa japonica (Japanese beautyberry – purple berries)

pf         Hosta lancifolia (Narrow leaf hosta – lavender – behind Bath House)

pb        Lagerstroemia x ‘Sioux’ (Crape myrtle – dark pink)

ber       Magnolia grandiflora (Southern magnolia – pinkish fuzzy cones with bright red berries)

b          Symphyotrichum cordifolium (Aster cordifolius/Blue wood aster – blue – behind Bath House)

WALK FROM GLASS CORRIDOR TO REFLECTING POOL

pf         Abelia x grandiflora (Glossy abelia – soft pink)

fb         Begonia grandis (Hardy begonia – pink)

pb        Clematis ‘Candida’ (Large-flowered clematis – white)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

pf         Hydrangea paniculata ‘Tardiva’ (Panicle hydrangea cultivar – white)

pb        Hydrangea serrata ‘Shirofugi’ (Tea of Heaven hydrangea cultivar – white)

fb,+     Liriope muscari (Blue lily-turf – lavender)

fb         Nymphaea species (Waterlily – pink, white)

fb         Pontederia cordata (Pickerelweed – blue)

fb         Solidago caesia (Blue-stemmed plume goldenrod – yellow)

ber       Viburnum dilatatum (Linden viburnum – red berries)

WALK FROM FISH PONDS – THE GLADE – TO BRIDGE

fb         Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Collinsonia canadensis (Horse balm – small yellow flowers)

pb        Egeria densa (Elodea – white – in upper koi pond)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pf         Heuchera villosa (Hairy alum root – creamy white)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

pb        Hydrangea arborescens (Smooth hydrangea – green)

pb        Hydrangea arborescens ‘Grandiflora’ (Hills of Snow hydrangea – green)

fb         Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue, white)

pf         Phlox paniculata (Garden phlox – pink, white)

ber       Smilacina racemosa (Maianthemum recemosum/False Solomon’s seal – bright red berries)

fb         Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

b          Symphyotrichum cordifolium (Aster cordifolius/Blue wood aster – blue)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

b          Tricyrtis variety (Toad-lily – white with purple speckles)

MARCH BANK

fb         Collinsonia canadensis (Horse balm – small yellow flowers)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

fbb       Kirengeshoma palmata (Wax bells – yellow)

pf         Phlox paniculata (Garden phlox – pink, white)

fb         Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

MAGNOLIA BEND AND WALK ON SOUTH SIDE OF STREAM

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Chelone glabra (Turtlehead – white)

fb         Collinsonia canadensis (Horse balm – small yellow flowers)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

pb        Hydrangea arborescens (Smooth hydrangea – white)

pb        Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf hydrangea – tan)

pf         Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue)

pb        Phlox paniculata (Garden phlox – pink)

fb         Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

fbb       Symphyotrichum cordifolium (Aster cordifolius/Blue wood aster – blue)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

GARDEN LANE

WINTERHAZEL WALK

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

fb,+     Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue, few white)

b          Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

ICEWELL TERRACE

fbb       Actaea acerina (Bugbane/fairy candles – white)

fbb       Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Collinsonia canadensis (Horse balm – small yellow flowers)

pf         Gentiana clausa (Closed gentian – dark blue)

pb        Phlox paniculata (Garden phlox – pink, white)

b          Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

PINETUM

ber       Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-pulpit – bright red berries)

pb        Chaenomeles cultivars (Flowering quince –  red, orange)

ber       Chaenomeles cultivars (Flowering quince – yellow fruits)

pb        Erodium cicutarium (Cranesbill – pink)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

ber       Idesia polycarpa (Iigiri tree – light orange berries)

pb        Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue, white)

ber       Malus species (Crabapple – red fruits)

fb         Oxalis species (Wood sorrel – yellow)

SUNDIAL GARDEN

fbb       Magnolia x soulangeana (Saucer magnolia – dark pink)

pb        Syringa variety (Lilac – single red-purple)

TRAFFIC CIRCLE

ber       Viburnum dilatatum ‘Xanthocarpum’ (Linden viburnum variety – yellow berries)

ENCHANTED WOODS

fb,+     Actaea acerina (Bugbane/fairy candles – white)

ber       Actaea pachypoda (Doll’s eyes – white berries)

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Anemone hupehensis (Anemone – dark pink)

fb,+     Begonia grandis (Hardy begonia – white, pink)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

fb         Heuchera villosa (Hairy alum root – creamy white)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

pb        Hydrangea arborescens ‘Grandiflora’ (Hills of Snow hydrangea – few white + greenish to tan)

pb        Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf hydrangea – greenish, turning pink to tan)

pf         Hydrangea serrata (Mountain hydrangea – white to greenish)

fb         Kirengeshoma palmata (Wax bells – yellow)

b          Salvia koyamae (Japanese sage – yellow)

fbb       Tricyrtis variety (Toad lily – white with purple speckles)

OAK HILL

East Side

ber       Callicarpa dichotoma (Purple beautyberry – purple berries)

fb,+     Colchicum byzantium (Autumn crocus – lavender-pink with white center)

fb,+     Colchicum ‘Giant’ (Autumn crocus – lavender-pink)

pb        Daucus carota (Queen Anne’s lace – white – in meadow)

pf         Eupatorium perfoliatum (Wetlands boneset – white – at bottom of meadow)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

pf,+     Hosta lancifolia (Narrow leaf hosta – lavender)

pf         Hydrangea involucrata ‘Tama Azisai’ (Bracted hydrangea – white with blue, pink)

pf         Lobelia cardinalis (Cardinal flower – red – at bottom of meadow)

fb         Polygonum hydropiperoides (Mild water-pepper – tiny white flowers – at bottom of meadow)

ber       Poncirus trifoliata (Hardy orange – fuzzy dark yellow fruits)

fb         Solidago caesia (Blue-stemmed plume goldenrod – yellow – in meadow)

b          Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

pb        Solidago graminifolia (Lance-leaved goldenrod – yellow – at bottom of meadow)

fb         Solidago juncea (Early goldenrod – yellow – in hillside meadow)

fb,+     Solidago variety (Goldenrod – yellow – at bottom of meadow)

b          Sternbergia lutea (Fall daffodil – yellow)

fb         Symphiotrichum ericoides (Aster ericoides/Heath aster – white – at bottom of meadow)

b          Symphiotrichum species (Aster – pale lavender-blue – at bottom of meadow)

b          Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

ber       Viburnum dilatatum ‘Xanthocarpum’ (Linden viburnum variety – yellow berries)

ber       Viburnum setigerum (Tea viburnum – orange berries turning red)

West Side

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

ber       Magnolia acuminata (Cucumbertree – red fuzzy cones)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

ber       Viburnum setigerum (Tea viburnum – red berries)

QUARRY, ADJACENT WALKS, AND OUTLET STREAM

b          Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white)

fb         Anemone x hupehensis (Anemone cultivar – pink)

pb        Clematis heracleifolia var. davidiana (Tube clematis – blue)

fb         Collinsonia canadensis (Horse balm – small yellow flowers)

pb        Eupatorium maculatum (Joe pye weed – white to pale lavender-pink)

fb,+     Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white)

fb,+     Heuchera villosa (Hairy alum root – creamy white)

pb        Hosta ‘Royal Standard’ (Royal standard hosta – white)

fb         Ligularia sibirica var. speciosa (Ligularia – yellow)

pb        Lobelia cardinalis (Cardinal flower – red)

pb        Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue)

fb         Oenothera biennis (Evening primrose – yellow – along Quarry outlet stream)

fb,+     Rudbeckia hirta (Black-eyed susan – yellow)

b          Solidago flexicaulis (Zig zag goldenrod – yellow)

fb         Solidago variety (Goldenrod – yellow)

fb         Tovara virginiana (Virginia knotweed – tiny greenish-white flowers along wiry stems)

b          Tricyrtis variety (Toad lily – white with purple speckles)

SYCAMORE HILL

ber       Catalpa species (Catalpa – long, green, string-bean-like seed pods)

fb         Colchicum byzantium (Autumn crocus – lavender-pink with white center – small clump behind the Brick Lookout near the edge of the meadow at the English oak [Quercus rober])

ber       Cornus kousa (Kousa dogwood – ‘pebbly’ green fruits turning red)

ber       Cotoneaster salacifolia (Cotoneaster – red berries)

fb,+     Heuchera villosa (Hairy alum root – creamy white)

pf         Hydrangea paniculata ‘Grandiflora’ (Pee Gee hydrangea – pinkish-tan)

pf         Leptodermis oblonga (Chinese leptodermis – rosy lavender)

pf         Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue)

pb        Rosa ‘Radwin’ (Winner’s Circle rose – red)

pf         Rosa species (Rose – white – around Brick Lookout)

pb        Spiraea x ‘Margaritae’ (Margarita spiraea – shades of pink)

fb         Viburnum rhytidophylloides (Leatherleaf viburnum – off-white)

ber       Viburnum setigerum (Tea viburnum – red berries)

pb        Weigela ‘Eva Rathke’ (Weigela cultivar – dark red)

pb        Weigela ‘Red Prince’ (Weigela cultivar – dark red)

WEST FRONT OF MUSEUM, STORE, AND CLENNY RUN

fb         Colchicum species (Autumn crocus – lavender-pink)

fb         Heptacodium miconoides (Seven-sons tree – white – behind Museum Store)

pb        Hydrangea arborescens (Smooth hydrangea – greenish)

pb        Hydrangea macrophylla (Bigleaf hydrangea – dark rose)

pb        Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Fuji Waterfall’ (Bigleaf hydrangea cultivar – white)

pb        Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf hydrangea – dried brown – in Clenny Run at Museum bridge)

ber       Ilex ‘Winter Red’ (Winterberry holly – red berries)

fb         Impatiens capensis (Jewel weed – orange – along Clenny Run)

pf         Liriope muscari (Blue lily-turf – lavender)

fb         Liriope muscari variety (White lily-turf – white – behind Museum Store)

fb         Polygonum hydropiperoides (Mild water-pepper – tiny white flowers – along Clenny Run)

fbb       Sternbergia lutea (Fall daffodil – yellow)

pb        Viburnum rhytidophylloides (Leatherleaf viburnum – off-white – along Museum Store and at Coach House)

GREENHOUSE AREA

pb        Hemerocallis ‘Happy Returns’ (Daylily – yellow)

fb,+     Hosta lancifolia (Narrow leaf hosta – lavender)

fb,+     Lablab purpureus (Hyacinth bean vine – purple)

ber       Lablab purpureus (Hyacinth bean vine – shiny purple seed pods)

ber       Ricinus communis variety (Castor oil plant – red seed pods)

fb         Sedum spectabile variety (Stonecrop – lavender-, pink)

BACK MEADOW – Top of Sycamore Hill to back ponds

ber       Asclepias syriaca (Common milkweed – green, prickly ‘teardrops’)

pf         Brassica species (Mustard – light yellow)

pb        Carduus nutans (Nodding thistle – reddish purple)

fb         Centaurea maculata (Spotted knapweed – purple)

fb         Chelone glabra (Turtlehead – white)

pf         Cicorium intybus (Chicory – blue)

pb        Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle – pale lilac)

pf         Coronilla varia (Crown vetch – lavender-pink)

pb        Daucus carota (Queen Anne’s lace – white)

pf         Eupatorium perfoliatum (Wetlands boneset – white)

pb        Hibiscus moscheutos ‘Luna Red’ (Hardy hibiscus variety – red – 1 bloom – along Quarry outlet stream)

b          Hibiscus moscheutos ‘Luna White’ (Hardy hibiscus variety – white – along Quarry outlet stream)

fb,+     Impatiens capensis (Jewel weed – orange)

pf         Lobelia siphilitica (Great lobelia – blue)

pb        Lycopus virginicus (Bugleweed – white)

fb         Oenothera biennis (Evening primrose – yellow – along Quarry outlet stream)

ber       Phytolacca americana (Pokeweed – green berries turning purple on red stems)

fb,+     Polygonum hydropiperoides (Mild water-pepper – tiny white flowers)

pb        Silphium perfoliatum (Cup plant – yellow)

b          Solanum carolinense (Horse-nettle – white to lavender ‘stars’ with yellow center)

fb,+     Solidago caesia (Blue-stemmed plume goldenrod – yellow)

pb        Solidago graminifolia (Lance-leaved goldenrod – yellow)

fb,+     Solidago juncea (Early goldenrod – yellow)

b          Symphyotrichum cordifolium (Aster cordifolius/Blue wood aster – blue)

b          Symphiotrichum ericoides (Aster ericoides/Heath aster – white)

fb         Symphiotrichum novae-angliae (Aster novae-angliae/New England aster – purple)

fb         Symphiotrichum species (Aster – pale lavender-blue)

pb        Trifolium pratense (Red clover – reddish purple)

fb         Typha latifolia (Cattail – brown ‘hot dogs’)

GARDEN LANE MEADOW – below Brown’s Woods

fb         Ageratina altissima (Eupatorium rugosum/White snake root – white – at edge of woods)

ber       Asclepias syriaca (Common milkweed – green, prickly ‘teardrops’)

pb        Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle – pale lilac)

pb        Coronilla varia (Crown vetch – lavender-pink)

pb        Daucus carota (Queen Anne’s lace – white)

fb         Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus/White wood aster – white – along edge of woods)

fb         Gnaphalium obtusifolium (Sweet everlasting – white)

fb         Oxalis species (Wood sorrel – yellow)

ber       Phytolacca americana (Pokeweed – green berries turning purple on red stems)

fb         Pycnanthemum species (Mountain mint – green with white ‘haze’)

fb,+     Rudbeckia hirta (Black-eyed susan – yellow)

pb        Solanum carolinense (Horse-nettle – white to lavender ‘stars’ with yellow center)

ber       Solanum carolinense (Horse-nettle – yellow berries)

fb,+     Solidago caesia (Blue-stemmed plume goldenrod – yellow)

pb        Solidago graminifolia (Lance-leaved goldenrod – yellow)

fb,+     Solidago juncea (Early goldenrod – yellow)

b          Symphiotrichum ericoides (Aster ericoides/Heath aster – white)

fb         Symphiotrichum lateriflorum (Aster lateriflorus/Calico aster – white)

fb         Symphiotrichum species (Aster – pale lavender-blue)

fb         Symphiotrichum novae-angliae (Aster novae-angliae/New England aster – purple)

pb        Trifolium pratense (Red clover – reddish-purple)

 

 Bloom Report Presented by:

Pauline Myers

The arrival of fall is always an exciting time of year for the garden staff at Winterthur. Cooler weather cues fall planting, deadheading, and weeding which really means one thing: prep for the winter ahead.

This is no different for migrating birds making their way through flyways heading to their overwintering locations. Did you know that Winterthur is a great place for birdwatching? Even a casual birdwatcher like myself can see some amazing avian animals pass through the property for all of autumn!

Using tools like BirdCast from the Cornell Ornithology Lab, you can predict when a big wave of migrating birds will come through your area. It looks like we’ll see a bit of heightened activity come through Winterthur tonight!

This week, I’ve been seeing small energetic warblers happily flitting through wooded riparian areas like Duck Pond Woods, Gray Building rd. and Old Nursery.

Clenny Run is a favorite spot of warblers like the Common Yellowthroat and the Black-and-white Warbler

You may also see raptors, like American Kestrels, Northern Harriers, and Red-tailed Hawks, soaring over meadows looking for a tasty snack.  Good places to see birds of prey are Old Gatehouse Meadow, Brown’s Meadow, and Armor Farm Meadow.

Adult Kestrel being banded by members of the DE Kestrel Partnership and DNREC

Don’t forget to consult our new trail map before you come, and bring your binoculars to see all the winged wonders coming through the property this fall!

Be sure to keep your eyes peeled later in the season for migrating waterfowl and shorebirds!

Double-crested Cormorant on a branch in East Barn Pond; taken through binoculars

 

On Saturday this last weekend I tried linking together a number of Winterthur’s paths – this resulted in a 6.9 mile hike through woodlands and meadows. The weather was clearing and, despite the humidity, there was a breeze. I have posted the trail to AllTrails for those who would like to try it (see below or follow this link https://www.alltrails.com/explore/recording/sat-29-aug-2020-23-03-4a3fd91?u=i).

 

Hydrangea paniculata (Panicle Hydrangea) is a star in the mid to late summer garden.  The large white panicles (a mix of sterile and fertile flowers) are breathtaking and often age to shades of pink.  The species grows in zones 3 to 8 making it a good choice for many gardens.  It is the most cold hardy of all the hydrangea species.  6 to 25 feet tall and wide these shrubs need some room to grow and are often grown (and pruned) as a small tree.  They prefer full sun to partial shade and are tolerant of most soil with good drainage.  Once established Hydrangea paniculata is the most drought tolerant species as well.  The blooms form on new wood (the current season’s growth).  Pruning can occur anytime between late summer (through fall and winter) and early spring.  There are many cultivars available with several growing in the Winterthur Garden.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Grandiflora’ (commonly referred to as PeeGee Hydrangea – paniculataGrandiflora’) was introduced in Japan in the 1860s.  Pee Gee Hydrangea is technically the common name for this particular cultivar however it has been turned into a reference to all paniculatas by some people and sources. 8 to 15 feet tall, they produce large while panicles of mostly sterile flowers (actually sepals) that reach to 18 inches in length.  Several can be found growing in the Summer Shrub Area, near the flag pole, along the front drive.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’ and Hydrangea paniculata ‘Little Lime’ are two popular cultivars growing in Enchanted Woods.  Both cultivars are new additions to Enchanted Woods and are not full grown yet.  ‘Limelight’ hydrangea is one of the most popular hydrangeas to grow.  It has very large flowers which will start off lime green in color and turn to hues of cream, pink, and burgundy as they age.  The flowers are held upright by strong stems and can grow up to 12 inches long.  It reaches 6 to 8 feet tall and wide.  For a smaller plant with the same attributes, look to ‘Little Lime’ hydrangea.  It is a smaller and more compact version of ‘Limelight’ with an overall size of 3 to 5 feet tall and wide.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Interhydia’ (Pink Diamond – Trademark name) is a cultivar with large white panicles that turn to a rich pink as they age.  It is a large shrub, 12 to 15 feet tall and wide, that makes a tremendous presence in the garden.  This cultivar can be found growing in Sycamore Hill, near the fence line.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Tardiva’ is one of my favorites growing at Winterthur.  We have one plant and it is located at the Reflecting Pool.  It is the latest cultivar to flower, blooming well into September.  The showy, white, sterile flowers slowly turn purplish pink with age and the smaller fertile flowers are more visible with this cultivar (typically the fertile flowers are hidden by the showier sterile flowers).

Visit the Winterthur Garden to catch these beauties in bloom!

Hydrangea paniculata in Summer Shrub Area along Front Drive

Pee Gee Hydrangea

Variations of panicles. Some cultivars have more showy sterile flowers (sepals) than others.

Pink Diamond in Sycamore Hill

Pink Diamond beginning to turn pink.

‘Tardiva’ beginning to bloom at the Reflecting Pool.

 

The fairies have been busy in Enchanted Woods!  Delight in their little village under the Upside Down Tree!

Fairy House Village in Enchanted Woods

The pictures below illustrate the steps involved with building one of the fairy houses.  All that is needed is some collected natural materials, a pair of pruners, a hot glue gun, and your imagination.  Using hot glue to attach the natural materials helps to “weather proof” the features of the house and provides moderate protection from the ramblings of garden critters.  The chipmunks in Enchanted Woods enjoy the village along with the fairies!  Once placed outdoors, other adornments (natural or otherwise) can be added to further embellish the house.  Fairy houses can certainly be built using all “loose” material as well but will be a little more ephemeral in nature.  This is a fun project for adults and kids alike!

 

Natural materials – pinecones, other cones, tree bark, twigs, monkey balls, moss

 

Chunk of wood

Bark roof and door, stick window frames

Stick window panes, pinecone awnings, cone window boxes, pinecone chimney, stick and cone light fixture

Dried moss

 

Fairy House in Enchanted Woods with other “loose” materials added to create village

The Faerie Cottage in the morning light with hostas and hydrangeas.

The Faerie Cottage in Enchanted Woods is a magical place!  The cottage is nestled in the shade of towering oak, beech, and tulip trees.  Located in the heart of our 3-acre children’s garden the cottage is loved by all.  Its stone walls, thatched roof, and mighty timbers have hosted the imaginative play of children for nearly twenty years.  It has also captured the imagination of adults who dream of having such a cottage in their own garden.  Over the years, the cottage has been embellished with different furniture arrangements, seasonal decorations, and container displays.  All together providing a whimsical experience.  The uniqueness of the cottage is charming, with many thoughtful elements “hidden” in its design.  These features may go unnoticed as children frolic and adults mill about taking photographs.  This summer take a moment to look for these “hidden” elements, old and new, and to observe the Faerie Cottage in a different way.  Discover a door to a gnome home (or is it Toad’s home?), a children’s picnic table re-imagined where fireflies roam (or fairies flutter?), and tiny creatures such as frogs, toads, and chipmunks, who live here.

The Faerie Cottage revealing the eagle sitting on its chimney.

Fairy Candles bloom next to the Faerie Cottage.

Inside the Faerie Cottage notice the concrete spheres in the wall, the sunburst over the side window, and a hidden gnome door.

The paver floor under the table patterned in the shape of an acorn and oak leaf shaped sconces above the mantel (this garden area once was part of Oak Hill).

Fireplace constructed from remnants of the estate.

 

Toad hiding in the ivy next to the fireplace.

Gnome home or Toad’s home? Photograph by Jason Zerbey.

Picnic table closeup. Is the light a firefly or fairy? Bring the kids for a visit and let them decide.

Grapevine ball and moss.

Little grapevine bird’s nest with moss ball.

The Faerie Cottage window offering a peak at the Bird’s Nest. Notice the tree branch design of the metalwork.

A few of these corner markers adorn the outside of the Faerie Cottage.

Tiny bunny spigot knob on the outside of the Faerie Cottage.

Close up of a sculpture adorning one of the outside walls. There are two of them and they are accessioned.

A beautiful embellishment on the back of the small bench near the chimney.

Architectural element in the outside wall.

Lovely detail of the “niches” on the outside of the Faerie Cottage.

 

Enjoy the magic of the Faerie Cottage!

Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf Hydrangea) is a beautiful native shrub!  Oakleaf hydrangea grows in zones 5 to 9 (originating from Georgia to Florida to Louisiana).  It will grow in full sun to shade, and prefers moist, well-drained soil.  It has an irregular, rounded habit with a size of 4 to 10 feet or more in height.  The leaves are reminiscent of red oak (Quercus rubra), attributing to it’s common name.  The dark green foliage can have outstanding red-purple fall color.  Bark is papery and exfoliating lending additional interest.  The flowers are glorious!  Panicles of white to creamy white often mature to pink, rose, and burgundy.  The panicles consist of a mix of sterile flowers (sepals) and tiny fertile flowers, and are fragrant.  Oakleaf hydrangeas bloom on old wood so care should be taken to prune at the proper time to ensure flowers for the next year.  Pruning should be completed by mid-August.  Like with other hydrangea species there are many cultivars to choose from, with the Winterthur Garden hosting a few.  Hydrangea quercifolia (straight species) grows on average 6 to 8 feet tall.  Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Alice’ is a large cultivar (10-14 feet tall) with flowers that age reliably to pink and burgundy and offers good fall color as well.  Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Sike’s Dwarf’ and Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Pee Wee’ are two smaller cultivars (in size, 3-5 feet, and flower).  Oakleaf hydrangeas can be found growing near the museum, near Magnolia Bend, and in Enchanted Woods.

Oakleaf hydrangea leaf and panicle

Oakleaf hydrangea flowers bloom above the foliage

Oakleaf hydrangea flowers beginning to age to pink and burgundy

Oakleaf hydrangeas near Magnolia Bend

Oakleaf hydrangeas near the Tulip Tree House in Enchanted Woods

Oakleaf hydrangeas in the foreground with Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ across the path in Enchanted Woods

Oakleaf hydrangeas on the left and Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ on the right in Enchanted Woods

Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ around the Maypole in Enchanted Woods with Oakleaf hydrangeas in the far background

 

 

 

Hydrangea macrophylla (Bigleaf Hydrangea) and Hydrangea serrata (Mountain Hydrangea) offer a multitude of different cultivars with lacecap and mophead flowers in shades of blue, pink, white, purple, and red.  Both are deciduous shrubs that prefer partial shade and moist, well drained soil.  If grown in full sun, H. macrophylla has a tendency for the foliage to appear limp or “wilted” during the hotter part of the day.  In my experience, H. serrata appears to tolerate more sun without the foliage looking limp.  H. macrophylla prefers to grow in zones 6 to 9, while H. serrata is slightly more cold tolerant growing in zones 5 to 7.  The species are very similar but overall H. serrata tends to be a smaller more compact shrub with smaller flowers and leaves than H. macrophylla.  In fact, the leaves may be the easiest way to determine the two species apart as H. macrophylla leaves are bigger (hence the common name Bigleaf Hydrangea), cabbage like, and more coarsely toothed.  Depending on the cultivar of either species, plants are 2 to 8 feet tall with an equal spread.

Soil pH affects the flower color of both species.  In acidic soil (pH below 7) flowers tend to be blue while in alkaline soil (pH above 7) flowers tend to be pink or lilac.  Although soil pH affects the color it does not affect the tone or depth of color.  For example, H. macrophylla ‘Nikko Blue’ will be sky blue in acidic soil and pale pink in alkaline soil.  It is not possible to change ‘Nikko Blue’ to a dark blue or dark pink flower by making the soil more acidic or more alkaline respectively.  Instead it is best to be selective when choosing which cultivar to grow if a particular color is desired.  In the Winterthur Garden we do not supplement the soil in any way to achieve flower color.  Our soil tends to be more acidic, which influences our H. macrophylla and H. serrata to be blue.  Along with flower color there are other attractive attributes reflected in some of the cultivars, in particular, stem and leaf color.

The majority of cultivars for both species produce flowers on old wood (the previous season’s growth).  To ensure flowering, pruning should be completed by mid-August.  If pruning occurs after that point (meaning in September through the following spring) the plant will not have flowers in the coming summer.  The question that we get asked the most about hydrangeas is “why aren’t my hydrangeas blooming?”  The answer is almost always that the plant was pruned at the improper time.  Other possibilities do include, deer browse and cold damage, but improper pruning is usually the culprit.  With all of that being said, there are a few cultivars of H. macrophylla that produce flowers on old and new wood (the current season’s growth), making improper pruning, deer browse, and cold damage less of an issue.  These cultivars have been popularized because of this attribute.  One of these cultivars is H. macrophylla ‘Bailmer’ (Endless Summer®).

I must take a moment to talk about how plants are named and the names given to some hydrangeas.  There has been a trend, mostly with H. macrophylla, to use trademarked names along with cultivar names, often resulting in confusion for those who are not aware of this naming trend.  For example, the Latin name for the popular Endless Summer Hydrangea is Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’.  Endless Summer is the registered trademark name.  It is often sold in a blue container printed with Endless Summer®, but inspection of the label will reveal Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’.  To break it down Hydrangea (is the genus), macrophylla (is the species), ‘Bailmer’ (is the cultivar), and Endless Summer® (is the registered trademark name signified by the tiny R inside a circle that appears at the end).  To add to the complexity of names, the producers of Endless Summer (Bailey Nurseries), have introduced four more hydrangeas that bloom on old and new wood, for a total of five.  All five cultivars are marketed under the Endless Summer “brand” but each have their own cultivar and registered trademark names.  The first of these plants is now marketed as Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’ (Endless Summer®TheOriginal).  These are all wonderful hydrangeas!  However, it makes it even more important to read the label when selecting and purchasing H. macrophylla so that you get the hydrangea that you desire.

Hydrangea macrophylla and Hydrangea serrata cultivars grow throughout the Winterthur Garden, including at the Visitor Center, Greenhouse complex, near the Museum, Reflecting Pool, and in Enchanted Woods.  Be sure to visit this summer to see these beautiful shrubs!

Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’ (Endless Summer®)

Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’ (Endless Summer®)

Hydrangea macrophylla cultivar (unknown cultivar) growing near Greenhouse complex

Hydrangea macrophylla (unknown cultivar) in foreground with Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ in background

Hydrangea macrophylla ‘HYMMADII’ (Midnight Duchess®) with lacecap flowers and purple black stems, growing at the Visitor Center

Hydrangea macrophylla ‘HYMMADIII’ (Princess Lace®) growing at the Visitor Center

Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Lady in Red’ with lacecaps that will age to burgundy-rose accompanied by red veins, stems, and fall color

Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ in Enchanted Woods

Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ flower tends to be paler in deeper shade but will deepen or be spotted with burgundy in the fall

Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ with Hydrangea arborescens cultivars in the background in Enchanted Woods

Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ with darker flowers due to being grown in more sun and this picture reveals the dark reddish, purplish stems of this cultivar

Hydrangea serrata ‘Blue Billow’ in the foreground displays a darker blue lacecap and good cold hardiness

Hydrangea serrata ‘Tokyo Delight’ growing near the museum

Hydrangea serrata ‘Tokyo Delight’ provides smaller more “refined” leaves than H. macrophylla cultivars

 

 

 

 

Hydrangea arborescens, Smooth Hydrangea, is a deciduous shrub which grows 3-6 feet tall and wide.  Native from New York to Florida, it prefers partial shade to shade but will tolerate more sun with ample moisture.  Hydrangea arborescens produces creamy white lacecap flowers, which feel airy in effect, when compared to the mophead flowers of the better known H. arborescens cultivars.  Two such cultivars Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ and  Hydrangea arborescens  ‘Grandiflora’ (Hills of Snow) provide ball shaped flowers, which turn from pale green to creamy white.  H. arborescens, H. arborescens ‘Annabelle’ and H. arborescens ‘Grandiflora’ are all found in the Winterthur garden, as well as a few other lacecap cultivars.

H. arborescens (lacecap)

H. arborescens ‘Annabelle’ (mophead)

Hydrangea arborescens (and cultivars) produce flowers on new wood (the current season’s growth).  Pruning can be accomplished in early spring.  For our area, I aim to finish any pruning by mid April.  Deadwood can be pruned anytime, regardless of the season, by cutting back to the live growth.  Often times with H. arborescens, pruning deadwood means cutting the branch to the ground.  In fact, H. arborescens can be cut back to the ground entirely if need be.  However, the new growth will not be as strong, leading to the branches flopping under the weight of the flowers, especially after any rain.  I prefer to only prune out the deadwood each year, which maintains a stronger branching structure to support all of the blooms.

H. arborescens at Magnolia Bend

H. arborescens ‘Grandiflora’ and ‘Annabelle’ in Enchanted Woods

The blooms are beautiful and pollinators love them too!  They enjoy the tiny fertile flowers in the center of the lacecaps.

The best locations in the Winterthur Garden to see these beauties are in the Glade, Magnolia Bend, along Clenny Run, and in Enchanted Woods.